Future Boss Club is an idea I wish I had thought of. And it’s no surprise to me that the idea came from our popular guest poster, Abigail Inglis. Abi works with a team of other inspiring women to help create the next generation of CEOs and business owners. Future Boss Club is your local girl gang, meeting of minds and general great time. Their next event, The Power Panel, is taking place November 29th – book tickets and meet this incredible cohort of Big Babes.

In the mean time, get to know them and their work a little better with our fabulous interview.

1. How did Future Boss Club come about? What is your overall aim?

Abi: Future Boss Club came about when my boss; CEO of The Women’s Organisation; Maggie O’Carroll, locked 10 of us in a room, all young, working female professionals, with a load of wine and food and said, “Make something happen!” – Maggie saw that there was nothing in the region for young, female professionals and she wanted us to do something about it. We stayed in the room for about 3 hours, ate, drank and chatted A LOT, and Future Boss Club was born!

Suzanne: We also hated the term ‘networking’ and the pressure/fear of attending these events! FBC aims to provide a safe and inspiring network, and regular events to support 18 – 30 year old females both professionally and personally.

2. Tell us about the types of events you have hosted previously

Lucy: Our events are content-focused and interactive. I know from my own personal experience how nerve wrecking and unenjoyable it can be to stand in a room of people and ‘mingle’. Future Boss Club is all about personal and professional development, so we like to know that our members are leaving every event having learnt something new.

Future Boss Club is all about personal and professional development, so we like to know that our members are leaving every event having learnt something new.

As young women, we like to touch the topics people think we know, but we actually don’t. Our most recent one was ‘Dollar Dollar Bills’ and this was my favourite event to date, it was a lesson in money-management and tackling everything from mortgages to car insurance and day-to-day finances – how amazing is that? I don’t think I’ve ever heard of that being done before and to me, I feel like Future Boss Club is really pushing boundaries, exploring new ground and actually making positive change.

Three of the founders of Future Boss Club, looking fierce. 

Abi: We’ve also organised and hosted five other events, plus our launch event, with three more to come before the end of the year! We had ‘Network Like A Boss’ a networking masterclass. ‘She Does Digital’ which was a panel event of incredible women working in the digital sector where we discussed how we could harness the power of digital for our personal and professional development.

3. What advice would you give to someone setting up their own events? Give us three golden rules.

Abi: My one golden rule for running event is to do a thought-dump. TIt’s part of my routine now; I do it before any event where I think of anything I could possibly need or anything that could possibly go wrong. Get all your worries, concerns and anxieties down on that piece of paper and then you can work through it.

If you have great content or speakers you’re excited about and a fab venue the little things will fall into place.

Suzanne: Don’t over complicate things and get bogged down in tiny details when you’re planning. If you have great content or speakers you’re excited about and a fab venue the little things will fall into place.

Lucy: Ask for help. You don’t have to be a Jackie of all trades. Know what you’re good at and ask for help when you need it. Whatever problem you come up against, someone else will have found a solution to it at some point or other.

4. You all work in jobs you love – what advice would you give women trying to break into a career that is also a passion?

Lucy: I consider myself really lucky to be in a job I love. Someone said to me that you should strive to be part of an organisation that has the same values as yourself and I’ve remembered that ever since. I wholeheartedly agree with everything The Women’s Organisation stands for, and it makes my job that much easier.

Someone said to me that you should strive to be part of an organisation that has the same values as yourself and I’ve remembered that ever since.

Abi: I guess my most annoying but truthful piece of advice is; it’s not what you know, it’s who you know, so get out there! Talk to people, make friends with everyone, be annoying, be persistent and build those relationships because you never know what’s around the corner and when someone might be looking for somebody just like you.

The full Future Boss Club team, chilling on a roof. 

5. What tools do you use to set up your events? 

Abi: We use Eventbrite to sell our tickets, then we use MailChimp to design and send our newsletters and manage our database. On top of this, we use Hootsuite to schedule our social media messages, as well as being active on Twitter and Instagram.

6. What do you think has influenced you all most to become feminists?

Abi: I had a long-drawn-out epiphany, and it began with me seeing episodes of everyday sexism around me and realising what a horrific place the world was for women to occupy. Then, I read everything that Laura Bates had ever written and then I couldn’t stop myself, I read feminist book after book and spent months educating myself on the world of feminism and the patriarchy.

Working for the Women’s Organisation has really encouraged me to be more outspoken on issues and calling out unfairness or injustice

Suzanne: I think I’ve always had a feminist outlook and don’t ever remember being told I couldn’t do something because I was a girl, but more recently I’ve realised the massive effect the media and corporate companies have on gender stereotyping (Bic Pens for girls anyone??) Working for the Women’s Organisation has really encouraged me to be more outspoken on issues and calling out unfairness or injustice. Also seeing hundreds of women setting up their own businesses or taking control of their personal lives is everyday inspo!

Future Boss Club Event with House of Suarez. 

Lucy: My experience at University is what encouraged me to become a feminist. My course had lots of feminist reading and it completely opened my eyes to gender inequality and I haven’t looked back since. Working at The Women’s Organisation, it’s part of my job to be aware of what’s going on in the world regarding feminism, so the interest in the topic has never really left me.

7. Where do you all go for your daily dose of inspiration?